Lineal Foot

Some types of wood are sold at a specific width and “per lineal foot” of length. This is in contrast to “per board foot,” which is a volume measure, and can be used to tally lumber of random widths. Example: If a 1 in. X 4 in. X 10 ft. board is priced by the … Continue reading Lineal Foot

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Quarter Measure

Lumber size is often referred to as 4/4 (pronounced FOUR-QUARTER), 5/4 (FIVE-QUARTER), 6/4 (SIX-QUARTER), etc. This refers to the thickness of the lumber when it is first sawn and in its rough dimensions. 4/4 lumber is sawn in the rough to a full 1 inch. The size increases in 1/4″ increments. 5/4 lumber is sawn … Continue reading Quarter Measure

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Rough (“RGH”)

“RGH” indicates that the specified material is being sold as it came off the saw. It is in its “rough” state. This material is not planer-finished and will have no jointed edges.

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Surfaced Three Sides (“S3S”)

The abbreviation “S3S” is a description of surface finish, usually pertaining to hardwood species. It stands for “Surfaced Three Sides”, which, as used in Goosebay’s hardwood lumber descriptions, indicates that two faces have been planed, and one edge has been processed with a “straight-line” rip saw, rendering the edge straight and smooth. The other edge … Continue reading Surfaced Three Sides (“S3S”)

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Dressed Four Sides (“D4S”)

“D4S” indicates that the materials have been surfaced on all four sides. NOTE: Dressing will change the actual size of a rough cut measurement. For example, a 4 X 4 piece of lumber dressed on four sides will have an actual measurement of approximately 3.5 X 3.5.

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Better (“BTR”)

When the abbreviation “BTR” is used as a suffix to a grade it indicates that the specified grade is enhanced as it includes varying quantities of higher grades.

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Grade D & Better (“BTR”)

This is the Pine grade that includes all of the select grades. This grade may allow sound tight knots (STK), but for the most part this lumber is clear and free of defects.

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